Friday, April 24, 2009

Economists on the Economics of Open Access Publishing

The March 2009 issue of Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP) (a journal that “runs a strict open access policy”) has a number of articles about the economics of open access publishing. (thanks to Kit Baum, Economics Dept. for alerting me to this information on the RePEc Blog):


-- Introduction, by Christian Zimmermann

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The Stratified Economics of Open Access, by John Willinsky

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But what have you done for me lately? Commercial Publishing, Scholarly Communication, and Open-Access, by John P. Conley and Myrna Wooders

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Publishing an E-Journal on a Shoe String: Is It a Sustainable Project?, by Piero Cavaleri. Michael Keren, Giovanni B. Ramello and Vittorio Valli

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Open Access Models and their Implications for the Players on the Scientific Publishing Market, by Steffen Bernius, Matthias Hanauske, Wolfgang König and Berndt Dugall

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Open Access Economics Journals and the Market for Reproducible Economic Research, by B.D. McCullough

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Estimating the Potential Impacts of Open Access to Research Findings, by John Houghton and Peter Sheehan

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The Economics of Open Bibliographic Data Provision, by Thomas Krichel and Christian Zimmermann

1 comment:

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